05
Aug 18

First chips

So it’s a weekend afternoon so if there’s a more civil time to use a planer, it involves taking a day off work. So to the shed!

First up, fitted the DRO to the planer. Slightly fiddly, and it does still bind a little so I’m sure it needs tweaking – or I could just remember how this is for roughing work only and how it doesn’t matter all that much and never touch it again đŸ˜€

It’s within 0.1mm after a very quick calibration. That’s… rather impressive. Well past my abilities so maybe I really don’t need to do much to this. Have to be careful not to kick the DRO when the machine’s put away mind.

This looks to be where it’s living for now at least – that DRO’s a tad more exposed than I’d like, especially if I’m getting at the tools in the plastic boxes on the left, which is a regular sort of thing (I really could use drawers there but shigata ga nai). Also, the sharpening plates are now riding on top of the thicknesser and an entire crate of finishing stuff is now displaced and living on top of the vacuum cleaner…

It really is getting cramped in here. And no, I have no more wall space left after the latest addition to the wall…

Oh well. On with the project I think. I took the walnut board I was thicknessing last time and fed it through the planer four times, three on one side, one on the other, taking small cuts each time of less than a half-mm.

Hm. Oh yeah. Extraction. đŸ˜€

Well, I have a 4-to-2.5-inch reducer in the post and I’ll hook that up to the extraction port when it gets here (and I’ve ordered the bits I need for that mod to do a quick-disconnect on the extraction hood as well). For now, this is manageable – just sweep the cuttings to the floor and then hoover up later.

It’s a shock to see how fast the process is though, not to mention how easy – I mean, you’d be able to keep up with the rate of material removal using a heavy-set scrub plane across the grain if the board was small, but for anything long, this just runs away with it and in terms of effort, it’s not even a comparison. I don’t plan to use it for anything other than roughing, but for taking a quarter-inch off a board in less than an evening’s free time, this thing’s excellent.

The noise is pretty hefty, but I discovered that putting a flat cushion between the thicknesser and the bench did cut down on the really unpleasant bass notes; the thicknesser seemed to have been resonating with the entire shed and the decking outside, which was… sortof impressive? Something to remember for the other machines as well I guess.

Anyway, with the board to rough thickness, out came the #05 and some finish planing was done (the board had bowed slightly in the last week or so because it had been sitting on the bench with one side planed and the other not), and then it was on to edge jointing…

The crosshatching is to watch material removal again. It took a bit of tweaking to get a joint I was okay with, and then a tad more planing of the boards individually to get a nice joint with a spring joint space in it, and then, glue-up…

Should be okay in the morning (the panel will have angled sides so those offsets are fine). The joint isn’t bad but the top will need some work with the plane to get a nice flat surface….

There’s almost a half-mm step there in the middle and we’re flush at the corners. Well, I’ve had worse and this is what hand planes are for…

 


04
Aug 18

Toys

Not done a tap in the shed in nearly two weeks now. Between work kicking up a notch and a short holiday away, not been near the place.

You might wish you were here, but it’s hard to know where “here” is…

 

On the way back, I did get to browse around The Carpentry Store for a few minutes, but alas they don’t carry Ashley Iles so I couldn’t try out those dovetail chisels. Mind you, I almost bought a few other things (but I was good…)

 

One day… when I have a bigger shed… it shall be mine…

 

And then there was the shiny shiny…

 

And I now finally understand why people go nuts for Stanley 51s…

This thing is awesome. For the price, it bloody well ought to be, but still. Wow. Solid. Chunky. But just so well balanced, so well put together. Damn nice. Maybe after I win the lotto đŸ˜€

And then there were lathes. I mean, even forgetting the fullsize monsters, there were ones that would fit on my bench…

You don’t really grok until you’re facing these just how compact they are. Which is a dangerous place to be when carrying a credit card đŸ˜€

But no, I think I’ll hold off on this a little longer because there was something already waiting for me in the mail room in the office. So we returned home, and then this morning junior and I headed into the office via the post office and…

It’s a nice little thing this, just a cheap and reasonably accurate DRO kit. Of course, then I needed something to attach it to, so…

đŸ˜€

Finally caved in and bought one second-hand from a poster on the UK woodworking forum. A bit of unwrapping later…

And that’s a wee bit larger than even I was expecting.

And holy hell it’s loud. 110dB when cutting wood. I mean, even if you hated your neighbours, you couldn’t do that very often. So this is basically just for when I need to do a lot of hogging off (basically replacing the scrub plane) instead of doing planing per se, and it will live under the bench most of the time (I need to move the sharpening gear, but then I wanted that to be out where I could get to it more readily anyway). I might have to move finishing stuff around a bit though, but hell, that’s life in my workshop. I have to move stuff around if I get a new idea, let alone a new tool. And it works quite well, though I need to get an adapter for the extractor and I’ll have to modify the extractor hood so it’s more readily removable/refittable because it’ll be taken on and off more often than DeWalt though to plan for. There is a mod to do that, I will probably be doing that:

I need to find a way to protect that DRO as well, instead of knocking it off when putting the planer away.

I did think about having a stand to put it (or the mitre saw) on and Lidl were doing a cheap special (which to be honest, looked exactly the same as every other cheap mitre saw stand for half the price) so:

However, given how loud that planer is, I think this is a non-runner. The soundmeter puts it at 110dB inside the shed, and 79dB on the deck outside the shed with the door closed and that’s just too damn loud. I think I can reduce it slightly with more sound baffling on the one surface left that isn’t already covered in baffling or lining:

But I think this is going to be one of those things that only happens for short times at civilised hours like weekend afternoons.

And lastly, the last time I was grinding metal out there for a scratch stock, I noticed a lot of sparks heading towards a lot of flammable things that I was standing in the middle of and at that point I became very cognisant of the distance to the nearest fire extinguisher, so….

Better safe than on fire I say…